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Millennial parents called Parennials

Introducing the Parennials – Millennial Parents

The first-wave of Millennials—those born in the 1980s and early 1990s—are becoming parents, and like all generations they are putting their own mark on raising children. In this age of generational label overkill, they even have been given their own name: Parennials.

As these Parennials transition to adulthood, they bring with them a brand new style of parenting that reflects their priorities in work/life balance that will affect employers for the next couple of decades.

And there are lots of them—already, more than 16 million Millennial women have children, and the number is growing by 1 million a year, according to Pew. Because they are having children later in life than previous generations—when their career is more established, they may have a better idea of what they want in life, and what they want in work.

If you are an employer of these Parennials, you will want to readjust your programs and resources to reflect their needs as new parents. Here are a few ways employers can do that:

Work to keep childcare stress at bay. An increasing number of workplaces are offering on-site childcare or setting policies that are childcare-friendly. If on-site daycare isn’t possible, offering pre-tax childcare savings or flex spending accounts (FSAs) and financial counseling as parents adjust to the reality of new expenses can help increase corporate loyalty among Parennials.

Set parent-friendly policies and schedules. Harvard Business Review reported, “Some organizations have implemented a policy that no meetings will start prior to 9:30 a.m. or end later than 4:30 p.m. This simple move cuts down on the anxiety surrounding timely daycare pick-up and drop-off, and the expense related to daycare overtime charges. When parents aren’t worried about running late, they can keep their mental energies focused on the business.”

In addition, offering perks such as closing the office early on Halloween, offering job shares (two people work 20 hours per week each) or providing paid time off for parent-teacher conferences and school functions can go a long way.

Invest more in telecommuting and remote communications. Flexibility around how, when and where work is done can all help keep Parennials engaged and productive. Some companies have found that investing in teleconferencing technology can help allow for schedule and work location flexibility while keeping co-workers connected to and engaged in the workplace.

Some Millennial and Generation X entrepreneurs are responding to these specific flexibility needs by creating professional co-working spaces attached to daycare centers or playrooms, such as Play, Work or Dash in Northern Virginia.

Set up workplace parent support groups. A new take on mentoring programs at work are parenting support groups. Millennials are the first generation who can get so much parenting advice online, but using the shared interest in parenting and how to juggle work and life can build bonds between coworkers and present new opportunities for mentorship. The Federal Government’s Office of Personnel Management offers a guide to creating these groups here.

Millennials are giving birth to 5 of every 6 babies today, so as an employer, consider building the programs and allocating resources now to help keep (and attract) the best Millennial employees.

It’s the Long Weekend: Set Your Millennials Free!

You will thank me for this advice. It’s Friday of Memorial Day weekend, the official start of the summer.  All those projects that are piling up? They will just have to wait.

Just because you, as a Boomer, or an early wave Xer like me, grew up in a “Work Is Life” culture, does not mean Millennials feel the same way about work.

All Work, No Play?

In the 1980’s, Boomers changed the definition of work. Work used to be punching time cards from 9 to 5 in factory-like precision. Remember when the work whistle went off for Fred Flintstone—Yaba Daba Do! But in the Boomer world of work, it was in early, out late. Once they were through their rebellious adolescence, Boomer adult took work seriously, some would say too seriously. They shattered the 9 to 5 paradigm and put meaning to the term ‘workaholic’.

BOOMERS on work: Work-Centric

The Ends Trump the Means

In the 1990’s Generation X redefined the work environment once again with a pay for performance mentality. For a GenXer, it didn’t matter how long you worked, it mattered that the job got done. These techno-literates used their creativity and adaptability to find new way to solve problems. And still find time for work/life balance. GenX Google founders Larry Page and Sergi Brim personified this ethic and built their $50 billion tech juggernaut.

GEN-X’s on work: Work/Life balance

Ummm… I just want a Life

Now here come the Millennials and once again, they will be redefining the work environment (but probably not until over 50% of them are over 30 in the 2020’s, replacing GenXers in management positions). In the meantime, what are their priorities on work and what is best way to motivate them?

First, recognize that family and friends always come first for Millennials. Their parents are BFF and their friends are their lifeline to… life—companionship, entertainment, activities, romance, etc. This does not mean that work is unimportant, but it does mean you have to understand their priorities.

Second, meaningful work is a meaningful life. Millennials want to do work that has an impact on the world around them. Can you connect the dots between their work and how it improves the lives of others? Barney & Barney, a successful insurance broker in California, has a thriving Foundation that contributes to the communities they serve. This really attracts the Millennials and they will put in the extra hours if they know it has meaning.

Lastly, and this is my GenX voice talking, define the goals you want them to achieve, and don’t meddle in the means to get there. Be clear about the goals, check in frequently on their progress (be positive and constructive) and give them the tools they need, but don’t make them stick around on a Friday if they can manage to finish the work on Thursday.

Millennials on work: Work-life Integration

Don’t stress out you Boomers… there’s always Monday… or in this case, Tuesday.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZclddLcOYYA]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZclddLcOYYA

It's the Long Weekend: Set Your Millennials Free!

You will thank me for this advice. It’s Friday of Memorial Day weekend, the official start of the summer.  All those projects that are piling up? They will just have to wait.

Just because you, as a Boomer, or an early wave Xer like me, grew up in a “Work Is Life” culture, does not mean Millennials feel the same way about work.

All Work, No Play?

In the 1980’s, Boomers changed the definition of work. Work used to be punching time cards from 9 to 5 in factory-like precision. Remember when the work whistle went off for Fred Flintstone—Yaba Daba Do! But in the Boomer world of work, it was in early, out late. Once they were through their rebellious adolescence, Boomer adult took work seriously, some would say too seriously. They shattered the 9 to 5 paradigm and put meaning to the term ‘workaholic’.

BOOMERS on work: Work-Centric

The Ends Trump the Means

In the 1990’s Generation X redefined the work environment once again with a pay for performance mentality. For a GenXer, it didn’t matter how long you worked, it mattered that the job got done. These techno-literates used their creativity and adaptability to find new way to solve problems. And still find time for work/life balance. GenX Google founders Larry Page and Sergi Brim personified this ethic and built their $50 billion tech juggernaut.

GEN-X’s on work: Work/Life balance

Ummm… I just want a Life

Now here come the Millennials and once again, they will be redefining the work environment (but probably not until over 50% of them are over 30 in the 2020’s, replacing GenXers in management positions). In the meantime, what are their priorities on work and what is best way to motivate them?

First, recognize that family and friends always come first for Millennials. Their parents are BFF and their friends are their lifeline to… life—companionship, entertainment, activities, romance, etc. This does not mean that work is unimportant, but it does mean you have to understand their priorities.

Second, meaningful work is a meaningful life. Millennials want to do work that has an impact on the world around them. Can you connect the dots between their work and how it improves the lives of others? Barney & Barney, a successful insurance broker in California, has a thriving Foundation that contributes to the communities they serve. This really attracts the Millennials and they will put in the extra hours if they know it has meaning.

Lastly, and this is my GenX voice talking, define the goals you want them to achieve, and don’t meddle in the means to get there. Be clear about the goals, check in frequently on their progress (be positive and constructive) and give them the tools they need, but don’t make them stick around on a Friday if they can manage to finish the work on Thursday.

Millennials on work: Work-life Integration

Don’t stress out you Boomers… there’s always Monday… or in this case, Tuesday.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZclddLcOYYA]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZclddLcOYYA